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Thinh Nguyen

Software Engineer 2 at Dell EMC

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Deploy Kubernetes on vSphere using Bosh Step by step tutorial on deploying kubo deployment

Step by step tutorial on deploying kubo deployment

How to deploy KUBO on vSphere

 

Thanks to Amanda Avarez for helping me writing this blog post

Table of contents

  1. Deploy Jumpbox
  2. Deploy Bosh Director
  3. Deploy Kubo

Our deployment uses the following configuration settings.

1. Deploy Jumpbox

Clone the repo

Create ops file

Create secrets file

Create jumpbox

Create ssh key for jumpbox

IP Forwarding for the Jumpbox

Let’s say that the jumpbox is going to have the following condition

  • eth0: Private Network connect to our local network

  • eth1: Public Network connect to the internet We want to access the public network through private network with the following steps

2. Deploy Bosh Director

Git clone kubo-deployment

Generate kubo-deployment env

Modify the secrets in kube env

Set jumpbox as Bosh Proxy and deploy bosh director. Access Director thru jumpbox (instead of being on the jumpbox)

The deployment may fail at last step due to unable to download bosh-dns-release?v=0.0.11. To fix this, download and upload the release manually:

When finish, try

3. Deploy Kubo

Download and upload releases

Deploy Kubo

Road trip to Persistence on CloudFoundry Chapter 2

Chapter 2

Road trip to Persistence on CloudFoundry

Chapter 2 – Bosh

Bosh is a deployment tool that can provision VMs on different IAAS such as AWS, OpenStack, vSphere, and even Baremetals. It monitors the VMs’ lives and keeps track of all processes that it deploys to the VMs. In this tutorial, we will focus on how to use bosh with vSphere. However, you can apply the same technique for your IAAS too. The reason we talk about Bosh in this roadtrip is because we use it to deploy Cloud Foundry.


Table of Contents


1. How it works

2. Install Bosh

  1. Create a Bosh Director Manifest
  2. Install
  3. Verify Installation

3. Configure Bosh

  1. Write your Cloud Config
  2. Upload cloud config to bosh director

4. Use Bosh

  1. Create a deployment Manifest
  2. Upload stemcell and redis releases
  3. Set deployment manifest and deploy it
  4. Interact with your new deployed redis server

1. How it works

Let’s say you want to bring up a VM that contains Redis on vSphere, you provide Bosh a vSphere stemcell (Operating System image) and a Redis Bosh Release (Installation scripts). Bosh then does the job for you.

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Are you excited yet? Let’s get started on how to install Bosh on your IAAS and use it.

2. Install Bosh

In order to use Bosh in vSphere, you will need to deploy a Bosh Director VM

1. Create a Bosh Director Manifest

This manifest describes the director VM’s specs. Copy the example manifest from this docs and place it on your machine. Modify the networks section to match that of your vSphere environment.

2. Install

After configuring your deployment manifest, install bosh-init tool from this docs. Then type the following command to deploy a Bosh director VM

3. Verify Installation

After completing the installation, download Bosh client to interact with Bosh director. If you have any installation problem, please refer to: docs

Then type

If the command succeed, you now have a functioning Bosh director.

3. Configure Bosh

To configure Bosh Director, you pass it a configuration file called Bosh Cloud Config. It allows you to define resources, networks, vms type specifically for all of your Bosh vms deployments.

alt text

1. Write your Cloud Config

To write your cloud config, copy the vSphere Cloud Config example here: tutorial and modify it accordingly.

2. Upload cloud config to bosh director

After defining a cloud config, you are then able to deploy VMs on Bosh.

4. Use Bosh

Let’s deploy a simple redis server vm on vSphere using Bosh.

1. Create a deployment Manifest

In this deployment manifest, I am deploying a redis VM using redis release and ubuntu stemcell. I wanted the VM type to be medium and the VM to be located at availability zone z1.

2. Upload stemcell and redis releases

Alternatively, you can download them and run bosh upload locally.

3. Set deployment manifest and deploy it

4. Interact with your new deployed redis server

Find your vm IP using

Connect to your redis server

Test it